Seventh Graders Build Vehicles to Protect Fragile Eggs in Collision Scenarios

Seventh Graders Build Vehicles to Protect Fragile Eggs in Collision Scenarios  thumbnail136525

Seventh graders – who have been studying the engineering process and exploring forces, speed and energy transfer in their science classes – recently put their knowledge to the test by building vehicles that could sustain a collision while protecting their fragile passenger, an egg. 

After conducting extensive research, the students worked in groups to design their cars and construct a safety restraint system for their passenger using a variety of materials, such as cardboard, bottle caps, sponges, straws, paint, cotton balls, plastic wrap and bags, bubble wrap and rubber bands. 

“They have been very creative with their designs, and it has been great to see how they work together to design, organize and build their projects,” science teacher Jessie Vega said. 

Students said they enjoyed the hands-on learning experience that allowed them to collaborate with their peers. 

“Some of the vehicles’ best features are bumpers and seat restraints,” Vega said. “Keeping the egg in place and having some material at the front of the car can absorb the energy from the collision.” 

To test their designs, the students will push their vehicles down an 8-foot ramp, record the time it takes them to reach the end to determine the speed of their cars and inspect their egg for any “minor injuries” to “fatal injuries.”