High School Students Design Original Board Games

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Rye Neck High School freshmen – who have been studying about the different world religions in their Global History classes – recently worked together to design their own board games as a way to expand their knowledge. 

The innovative project, which spanned a couple of weeks in Robert Brevetti’s, Andrea Katz’s and Marcella Scalise’s classes, allowed the students to be creative, think critically and collaborate with their classmates. The process began with the ninth-graders completing several activities to compare and contrast the ideas behind the major world religions that influenced the world. Then, drawing inspiration from their favorite board games, they created new rules and incorporated elements of one of the major world religions into their projects, decorated their game boards and created tokens or game pieces.

“They worked hard to use the main ideas and beliefs of their religion to make a fun and interesting board game,” Scalise said.

One group collaborated on reinventing Candyland by incorporating facts about the different Christian beliefs. Other student-created games included Buddhism Candyland, Buddhism Trouble, Christianity Monopoly, Christianity Trouble, Hinduism Candyland, Hinduism Chutes and Ladders, Hinduism Game of Life, Hinduism Sorry, Judaism Chutes and Ladders and Life of a Christian.

Freshman Danielle Lindo said creating a board game with her friends allowed her to learn new facts about the different religions. Cora Radulovic, a freshman, said she enjoyed the creative aspect of the project, which allowed her and her classmates to express their ideas and apply their knowledge in a fun way. 

“I’m hoping our students now have a better understanding of the religion they did their projects on and how important these world religions are still today,” Scalise said. “The board games project was an interactive way for them to review the major ideas and beliefs of the world religions.” 

Scalise said the students will play their board games in class as a way to prepare for their midterm and final exams.